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An Overview of Daily Scrum Patterns


Notes:

Talk Order

Most teams start out with a <Round Robin> approach. Teams that are distributed or are highly self organizing might use the <Talking Stick> approach. Some teams become better at getting work done if they <Walk The Items> instead, but use caution as that approach can lead to a Daily Scrum that <Turns Into Waterfall Status Meeting> (See "Facilitation Patterns" Below).

Also, don't forget to be creative and <Create Your Own Pattern>, and don't ever hesitate to use a technique that is not described by a documented pattern.
Talk Order Patterns:

Obstacle Resolution

Many teams <Defer Obstacle Resolution> until after the Daily Scrum, but some teams <Allow Obstacle Resolution> if they can still avoid busting the 15 minute time-box. Having said that, it's generally considered a bad practice if your team decides to <Save All Obstacles For the Daily Scrum>.

Some teams use <The After Party> to handle obstacle resolution and other conversations inappropriate for the Daily Scrum, and that's probably fine unless <The After Party Defeats the Purpose of the Daily Scrum>.

Also, don't forget to be creative and <Create Your Own Pattern>, and don't ever hesitate to use a technique that is not described by a documented pattern.
Obstacle Resolution Patterns:

Facilitation

Most teams hold the Daily Scrum as a <Standup Meeting>, but this is not required in Scrum, and some teams that are distributed feel like it's ok to hold a <Sit Down Meeting> so long as they are faithfully executing the objectives of the Daily Scrum.

Teams just starting with Scrum might benefit from a <Close Facilitator>, so long as that doesn't turn into a <Controlling Facilitator>. A bad practice is facilitating a Daily Scrum such that it <Turns into a Waterfall Status Meeting>.

Also, don't forget to be creative and <Create Your Own Pattern>, and don't ever hesitate to use a technique that is not described by a documented pattern.
Facilitation Patterns:

Who Participates?

The Scrum Guide says that "the Scrum Master enforces the rule that only Development Team members participate in the Daily Scrum." However, some practitioners think it might be ok if the <Product Owner Participates> in the Daily Scrum. Having said that, it is incorrect Scrum if a <Non Scrum Team Member Participates> in the Daily Scrum, so consider using <The After Party> to let non Scrum Team Members communicate with the Scrum Team.

Also, don't forget to be creative and <Create Your Own Pattern>, and don't ever hesitate to use a technique that is not described by a documented pattern.
Who Participates? Patterns:


Who Attends?


According to the Scrum Guide, the Development Team must attend. With many teams, and especially Shu level teams, the <Scrum Master Attends>. It's usually a good practice if the <Product Owner Attends> so that they can help the Development Team if needed, often times at <The After Party>. It's usually not good if an <Authority Figure Attends> on a regular basis.

Also, don't forget to be creative and <Create Your Own Pattern>, and don't ever hesitate to use a technique that is not described by a documented pattern.
Who Attends? Patterns:

The Sprint Backlog at the Daily Scrum


While it's a popular and proven practice to <View the Sprint Backlog at the Daily Scrum>, it's a controversial practice to <Update the Sprint Backlog at the Daily Scrum>, as the updating can detract from the true objectives and focus of the Daily Scrum in some situations.

Also, don't forget to be creative and <Create Your Own Pattern>, and don't ever hesitate to use a technique that is not described by a documented pattern.
The Sprint Backlog at the Daily Scrum Patterns:


Q. How can I contribute my own Daily Scrum (or just general Scrum) patterns?

A. We're still in a "beta" stage, but we certainly encourage you to contribute your own patterns. So, for now, we simply ask that you email your idea to "patterns (at) scrumcrazy [dot] com" . Try to include a title, a 2-3 sentence summary, and some context ("possibly good for," "possibly bad for," etc). Your email doesn't have to be polished or perfect. We'll respond within a few business days.


Notes

  • Mad props to Thoughtworks for their Daily Standup patterns page, though I wanted to make these patterns specific to Scrum, so I have adapted them as necessary.
    • I must also point out there are significant differences between a "Daily Standup" meeting and a "Daily Scrum". Consult the Scrum Guide for more info on what a Daily Scrum truly is.
  • I've gleaned these patterns from many different experiences and sources, and if you feel a particular pattern was well documented elsewhere before this post (March 2013), then please contact us through our patterns email address: patterns (at) scrumcrazy [dot] com. We are certainly more than happy to give credit where credit is due.
  • Special thanks to Dominik Maximini and Joshua Partogi for their very valuable contributions to this pattern effort.



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